David Bowie exhibition in Berlin

David Bowie exhibition

David Bowie exhibition

The exhibition David Bowie is coming to the German capital. Berlin is the city where the exceptional artist has spent some of the most productive years of his career.

On 20 May 2014 the exhibition curated by the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, opens its doors to the public. Exhibition venue is the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin. Be among the first to experience a spectacular show!

THE RETROSPECTIVE

David Bowie is the first international retrospective of the extraordinary career of David Bowie – one of the most pioneering and influential performers of modern times.

The exhibition demonstrates how Bowie’s work has both influenced and been influenced by wider movements in art, design, theatre and contemporary culture and focuses on his creative processes, shifting style and collaborative work with diverse designers in the fields of fashion, sound, graphics, theatre and film.

DAVID BOWIE IN BERLIN

The Berlin stop is one of the highlights of the international exhibition tour due to the intimate relationship between Bowie and the German capital. The exhibition sends the visitors on a time journey through the subculture of West Berlin during the 1970s, the time when Bowie and dazzling companions such as Iggy Pop influenced the Berlin nightlife.

The Berlin years 1976/78 were some of the most productive years of Bowie’s career; it was then when he wrote music history. He drew creative energy from the city and created a triptych of groundbreaking albums: Low, Lodger and the centrepiece Heroes. It was recorded within sight of the Berlin Wall at Hansa Studios. Here, he and his companions experimented with avantgardistic concepts of their personalities breaking boundaries between fashion, music and performance art – life and art merged to something radically new.

The exhibition in the Martin-Gropius-Bau shows those intensive relationships and presents objects which have been gathered up especially for the Berlin stop of the tour.

"In 1987, Bowie returned to the divided city to perform for a crowd of 70,000 fans, their sparklers and candles glittering around the Reichstag. Towards the end of the show he read aloud a message in German. “We send our best wishes to all our friends who are on the other side of the Wall.” Then he sang “Time will Crawl”. On the other side of the hateful divide, hundreds of young East Berliners strained to hear echoes of the concert. They caught sight of stage lights flashing off blank, bullet-marked walls. They heard Bowie greet them. They listened to his song. Their song. Berlin’s song. “We can be heroes, just for one day,” he sang in a daring, ironic elegy to both the divided world and his past life.  As “Time will Crawl” reached its climax some of the East German crowd pushed towards the Brandenburg Gate, whistling and chanting, “Down with the Wall”. They threw insults and bottles at the Volkspolizei, rising together in a rare moment of protest. On stage Bowie heard the cheers from the other side. He was in tears." Read full article: The Berlin landmarks that inspired David Bowie  http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/b20113b0-8753-11e3-9c5c-00144feab7de.html#axzz2s3ZrCQb6

“In 1987, Bowie returned to the divided city to perform for a crowd of 70,000 fans, their sparklers and candles glittering around the Reichstag. Towards the end of the show he read aloud a message in German. “We send our best wishes to all our friends who are on the other side of the Wall.”
Then he sang “Time will Crawl”.
On the other side of the hateful divide, hundreds of young East Berliners strained to hear echoes of the concert. They caught sight of stage lights flashing off blank, bullet-marked walls. They heard Bowie greet them. They listened to his song. Their song. Berlin’s song. “We can be heroes, just for one day,” he sang in a daring, ironic elegy to both the divided world and his past life.
As “Time will Crawl” reached its climax some of the East German crowd pushed towards the Brandenburg Gate, whistling and chanting, “Down with the Wall”. They threw insults and bottles at the Volkspolizei, rising together in a rare moment of protest. On stage Bowie heard the cheers from the other side. He was in tears.”
Read full article: The Berlin landmarks that inspired David Bowie
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/b20113b0-8753-11e3-9c5c-00144feab7de.html#axzz2s3ZrCQb6

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